dnsmasq.conf sample

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computing: software: dnsmasq: dnsmasq.conf: sample

Overview

This is a sample of dnsmasq.conf, mainly included because of all the comments. I'm stripping all the comments out of my actual file so I can see which lines are actually in use. This is a fairly basic configuration which uses /etc/hosts as well as having additional local-machinename definitions in a file called /etc/dnsmasqhosts.

Contents

# Configuration file for dnsmasq.
#
# Format is one option per line, legal options are the same
# as the long options legal on the command line. See
# "/usr/sbin/dnsmasq --help" or "man 8 dnsmasq" for details.

# The following two options make you a better netizen, since they
# tell dnsmasq to filter out queries which the public DNS cannot
# answer, and which load the servers (especially the root servers)
# uneccessarily. If you have a dial-on-demand link they also stop
# these requests from bringing up the link uneccessarily.

# Never forward plain names (without a dot or domain part)
domain-needed
# Never forward addresses in the non-routed address spaces.
bogus-priv


# Uncomment this to filter useless windows-originated DNS requests
# which can trigger dial-on-demand links needlessly.
# Note that (amongst other things) this blocks all SRV requests,
# so don't use it if you use eg Kerberos.
# This option only affects forwarding, SRV records originating for
# dnsmasq (via srv-host= lines) are not suppressed by it.
#filterwin2k

# Change this line if you want dns to get its upstream servers from
# somewhere other that /etc/resolv.conf
#resolv-file=
resolv-file=/etc/dnsmasqupstreamservers

# By  default,  dnsmasq  will  send queries to any of the upstream
# servers it knows about and tries to favour servers to are  known
# to  be  up.  Uncommenting this forces dnsmasq to try each query
# with  each  server  strictly  in  the  order  they   appear   in
# /etc/resolv.conf
#strict-order

# If you don't want dnsmasq to read /etc/resolv.conf or any other
# file, getting its servers from this file instead (see below), then
# uncomment this
#no-resolv

# If you don't want dnsmasq to poll /etc/resolv.conf or other resolv
# files for changes and re-read them then uncomment this.
#no-poll

# Add other name servers here, with domain specs if they are for
# non-public domains.
#server=/localnet/192.168.0.1
#server=166.70.63.3

# Add local-only domains here, queries in these domains are answered
# from /etc/hosts or DHCP only.
#local=/localnet/

# Add domains which you want to force to an IP address here.
# The example below send any host in doubleclick.net to a local
# webserver.
#address=/doubleclick.net/127.0.0.1

# If you want dnsmasq to change uid and gid to something other
# than the default, edit the following lines.
#user=
#group=

# If you want dnsmasq to listen for DHCP and DNS requests only on
# specified interfaces (and the loopback) give the name of the
# interface (eg eth0) here.
# Repeat the line for more than one interface.
#interface=
# Or you can specify which interface _not_ to listen on
#except-interface=
# Or which to listen on by address (remember to include 127.0.0.1 if
# you use this.)
#listen-address=
# If you want dnsmasq to provide only DNS service on an interface,
# configure it as shown above, and then use the following line to
# disable DHCP on it.
#no-dhcp-interface=

# On systems which support it, dnsmasq binds the wildcard address,
# even when it is listening on only some interfaces. It then discards
# requests that it shouldn't reply to. This has the advantage of
# working even when interfaces come and go and change address. If you
# want dnsmasq to really bind only the interfaces it is listening on,
# uncomment this option. About the only time you may need this is when
# running another nameserver on the same machine.
#bind-interfaces

# If you don't want dnsmasq to read /etc/hosts, uncomment the
# following line.
#no-hosts
# or if you want it to read another file, as well as /etc/hosts, use
# this.
#addn-hosts=/etc/banner_add_hosts
addn-hosts=/etc/dnsmasqhosts

# Set this (and domain: see below) if you want to have a domain
# automatically added to simple names in a hosts-file.
#expand-hosts

# Set the domain for dnsmasq. this is optional, but if it is set, it
# does the following things.
# 1) Allows DHCP hosts to have fully qualified domain names, as long
#     as the domain part matches this setting.
# 2) Sets the "domain" DHCP option thereby potentially setting the
#    domain of all systems configured by DHCP
# 3) Provides the domain part for "expand-hosts"
#domain=thekelleys.org.uk

# Uncomment this to enable the integrated DHCP server, you need
# to supply the range of addresses available for lease and optionally
# a lease time. If you have more than one network, you will need to
# repeat this for each network on which you want to supply DHCP
# service.
dhcp-range=192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,12h

# This is an example of a DHCP range where the netmask is given. This
# is needed for networks we reach the dnsmasq DHCP server via a relay
# agent. If you don't know what a DHCP relay agent is, you probably
# don't need to worry about this.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,255.255.255.0,12h

# This is an example of a DHCP range with a network-id, so that
# some DHCP options may be set only for this network.
#dhcp-range=red,192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150

# Supply parameters for specified hosts using DHCP. There are lots
# of valid alternatives, so we will give examples of each. Note that
# IP addresses DO NOT have to be in the range given above, they just
# need to be on the same network. The order of the parameters in these
# do not matter, it's permissble to give name,adddress and MAC in any order

# Always allocate the host with ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
# The IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,192.168.0.60

# Always set the name of the host with hardware address
# 11:22:33:44:55:66 to be "fred"
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,fred

# Always give the host with ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
# the name fred and IP address 192.168.0.60 and lease time 45 minutes
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,fred,192.168.0.60,45m
dhcp-host=00:0e:2e:0d:44:be,Bunsen,192.168.0.106

# Give the machine which says it's name is "bert" IP address
# 192.168.0.70 and an infinite lease
#dhcp-host=bert,192.168.0.70,infinite

# Always give the host with client identifier 01:02:02:04
# the IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=id:01:02:02:04,192.168.0.60

# Always give the host with client identifier "marjorie"
# the IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=id:marjorie,192.168.0.60

# Enable the address given for "judge" in /etc/hosts
# to be given to a machine presenting the name "judge" when
# it asks for a DHCP lease.
#dhcp-host=judge

# Never offer DHCP service to a machine whose ethernet
# address is 11:22:33:44:55:66
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,ignore

# Ignore any client-id presented by the machine with ethernet
# address 11:22:33:44:55:66. This is useful to prevent a machine
# being treated differently when running under different OS's or
# between PXE boot and OS boot.
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,id:*

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to
# the machine with ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,net:red

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to
# any machine with ethernet address starting 11:22:33:
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:*:*:*,net:red

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine whose
# DHCP vendorclass string includes the substring "Linux"
#dhcp-vendorclass=red,Linux

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine one
# of whose DHCP userclass strings includes the substring "accounts"
#dhcp-userclass=red,accounts

# If this line is uncommented, dnsmasq will read /etc/ethers and act
# on the ethernet-address/IP pairs found there just as if they had
# been given as --dhcp-host options. Useful if you keep
# MAC-address/host mappings there for other purposes.
#read-ethers

# Send options to hosts which ask for a DHCP lease.
# See RFC 2132 for details of available options.
# Note that all the common settings, such as netmask and
# broadcast address, DNS server and default route, are given
# sane defaults by dnsmasq. You very likely will not need any
# any dhcp-options. If you use Windows clients and Samba, there
# are some options which are recommended, they are detailed at the
# end of this section.
# For reference, the common options are:
# subnet mask - 1
# default router - 3
# DNS server - 6
# broadcast address - 28

# Set the NTP time server addresses to 192.168.0.4 and 10.10.0.5
#dhcp-option=42,192.168.0.4,10.10.0.5
dhcp-option=3,192.168.0.1

# Set the NTP time server address to be the same machine as
# is running dnsmasq
#dhcp-option=42,0.0.0.0

# Set the NIS domain name to "welly"
#dhcp-option=40,welly

# Set the default time-to-live to 50
#dhcp-option=23,50

# Set the "all subnets are local" flag
#dhcp-option=27,1

# Send the etherboot magic flag and then etherboot options (a string).
#dhcp-option=128,e4:45:74:68:00:00
#dhcp-option=129,NIC=eepro100

# Specify an option which will only be sent to the "red" network
# (see dhcp-range for the declaration of the "red" network)
#dhcp-option=red,42,192.168.1.1

# The following DHCP options set up dnsmasq in the same way as is specified
# for the ISC dhcpcd in
# http://www.samba.org/samba/ftp/docs/textdocs/DHCP-Server-Configuration.txt
# adapted for a typical dnsmasq installation where the host running
# dnsmasq is also the host running samba.
# you may want to uncomment them if you use Windows clients and Samba.
#dhcp-option=19,0           # option ip-forwarding off
#dhcp-option=44,0.0.0.0     # set netbios-over-TCP/IP nameserver(s) aka WINS server(s)
#dhcp-option=45,0.0.0.0     # netbios datagram distribution server
#dhcp-option=46,8           # netbios node type
#dhcp-option=47             # empty netbios scope.

# Send RFC-3397 DNS domain search DHCP option. WARNING: Your DHCP client
# probably doesn't support this......
#dhcp-option=119,eng.apple.com,marketing.apple.com

# Send encapsulated vendor-class specific options. The vendor-class
# is sent as DHCP option 60, and all the options marked with the
# vendor class are send encapsulated in DHCP option 43. The meaning of
# the options is defined by the vendor-class. This example sets the
# mtftp address to 0.0.0.0 for PXEClients
#dhcp-option=vendor:PXEClient,1,0.0.0.0

# Set the boot filename and tftpd server name and address
# for BOOTP. You will only need this is you want to
# boot machines over the network.
#dhcp-boot=/var/ftpd/pxelinux.0,boothost,192.168.0.3

# Set the limit on DHCP leases, the default is 150
#dhcp-lease-max=150

# The DHCP server needs somewhere on disk to keep its lease database.
# This defaults to a sane location, but if you want to change it, use
# the line below.
#dhcp-leasefile=/var/lib/misc/dnsmasq.leases

# Set the DHCP server to authoritative mode. In this mode it will barge in
# and take over the lease for any client which broadcasts on the network,
# whether it has a record of the lease or not. This avoids long timeouts
# when a machine wakes up on a new network. DO NOT enable this if there's
# the slighest chance that you might end up accidentally configuring a DHCP
# server for your campus/company accidentally. The ISC server uses the same
# the same option, and this URL provides more information:
# http://www.isc.org/index.pl?/sw/dhcp/authoritative.php
#dhcp-authoritative

# Set the cachesize here.
#cache-size=150

# If you want to disable negative caching, uncomment this.
#no-negcache

# Normally responses which come form /etc/hosts and the DHCP lease
# file have Time-To-Live set as zero, which conventionally means
# do not cache further. If you are happy to trade lower load on the
# server for potentially stale date, you can set a time-to-live (in
# seconds) here.
#local-ttl=

# If you want dnsmasq to detect attempts by Verisign to send queries
# to unregistered .com and .net hosts to its sitefinder service and
# have dnsmasq instead return the correct NXDOMAIN response, uncomment
# this line. You can add similar lines to do the same for other
# registries which have implemented wildcard A records.
#bogus-nxdomain=64.94.110.11

# If you want to fix up DNS results from upstream servers, use the
# alias option. This only works for IPv4.
# This alias makes a result of 1.2.3.4 appear as 5.6.7.8
#alias=1.2.3.4,5.6.7.8
# and this maps 1.2.3.x to 5.6.7.x
#alias=1.2.3.0,5.6.7.0,255.255.255.0


# Change these lines if you want dnsmasq to serve MX records.

# Return an MX record named "maildomain.com" with target
# servermachine.com and preference 50
#mx-host=maildomain.com,servermachine.com,50

# Set the default target for MX records created using the localmx option.
#mx-target=servermachine.com

# Return an MX record pointing to the mx-target for all local
# machines.
#localmx

# Return an MX record pointing to itself for all local machines.
#selfmx

# Change the following lines if you want dnsmasq to serve SRV
# records.  These are useful if you want to serve ldap requests for
# Active Directory and other windows-originated DNS requests.
# See RFC 2782.
# You may add multiple srv-host lines.
# The fields are <name>,<target>,<port>,<priority>,<weight>
# If the domain part if missing from the name (so that is just has the
# service and protocol sections) then the domain given by the domain=
# config option is used. (Note that expand-hosts does not need to be
# set for this to work.)

# A SRV record sending LDAP for the example.com domain to
# ldapserver.example.com port 289
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389

# A SRV record sending LDAP for the example.com domain to
# ldapserver.example.com port 289 (using domain=)
#domain=example.com
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp,ldapserver.example.com,389

# Two SRV records for LDAP, each with different priorities
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389,1
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389,2

# A SRV record indicating that there is no LDAP server for the domain
# example.com
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com


# Change the following lines to enable dnsmasq to serve TXT records.
# These are used for things like SPF and zeroconf. (Note that the
# domain-name expansion done for SRV records _does_not
# occur for TXT records.)

#Example SPF.
#txt-record=example.com,v=spf1 a -all

#Example zeroconf
#txt-record=_http._tcp.example.com,name=value,paper=A4


# For debugging purposes, log each DNS query as it passes through
# dnsmasq.
#log-queries

# Include a another lot of configuration options.
#conf-file=/etc/dnsmasq.more.conf