smb.conf/manpage/2006/parameters/F

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fake directory create times

      fake directory create times (S)
             NTFS  and  Windows  VFAT file systems keep a create time for all
             files and directories. This is not the same as the ctime -  sta-
             tus  change  time - that Unix keeps, so Samba by default reports
             the earliest of the various times Unix does keep.  Setting  this
             parameter  for  a  share  causes Samba to always report midnight
             1-1-1980 as the create time for directories.
             This option is mainly used as a compatibility option for  Visual
             C++  when  used against Samba shares. Visual C++ generated make-
             files have the object directory as a dependency for each  object
             file,  and a make rule to create the directory. Also, when NMAKE
             compares timestamps it uses the creation time when  examining  a
             directory.  Thus the object directory will be created if it does
             not exist, but once it does exist it will always have an earlier
             timestamp than the object files it contains.
             However,  Unix time semantics mean that the create time reported
             by Samba will be updated  whenever  a  file  is  created  or  or
             deleted  in  the  directory. NMAKE finds all object files in the
             object directory. The timestamp of the last one  built  is  then
             compared to the timestamp of the object directory. If the direc-
             tory's timestamp  if  newer,  then  all  object  files  will  be
             rebuilt. Enabling this option ensures directories always predate
             their contents and an NMAKE build will proceed as expected.
             Default: _�f_�a_�k_�e _�d_�i_�r_�e_�c_�t_�o_�r_�y _�c_�r_�e_�a_�t_�e _�t_�i_�m_�e_�s = no

fake oplocks

      fake oplocks (S)
             Oplocks are the way that  SMB  clients  get  permission  from  a
             server  to  locally cache file operations. If a server grants an
             oplock (opportunistic lock) then the client is  free  to  assume
             that  it  is the only one accessing the file and it will aggres-
             sively cache file data. With some oplock types  the  client  may
             even  cache  file  open/close operations. This can give enormous
             performance benefits.
             When you set f�fa�ak�ke�e o�op�pl�lo�oc�ck�ks�s  =�=  y�ye�es�s,  s�sm�mb�bd�d(8)  will  always  grant
             oplock requests no matter how many clients are using the file.
             It  is  generally  much  better  to use the real _�o_�p_�l_�o_�c_�k_�s support
             rather than this parameter.
             If you enable this option on all read-only shares or shares that
             you know will only be accessed from one client at a time such as
             physically read-only media like CDROMs, you will see a big  per-
             formance  improvement  on  many  operations.  If you enable this
             option on shares where multiple clients  may  be  accessing  the
             files  read-write  at the same time you can get data corruption.
             Use this option carefully!
             Default: _�f_�a_�k_�e _�o_�p_�l_�o_�c_�k_�s = no

follow symlinks

      follow symlinks (S)
             This  parameter  allows  the   Samba   administrator   to   stop
             s�sm�mb�bd�d(8)from following symbolic links in a particular share. Set-
             ting this parameter to n�no�o prevents any file or directory that is
             a  symbolic  link  from  being  followed  (the  user will get an
             error). This option is very useful to stop users from  adding  a
             symbolic  link  to  _�/_�e_�t_�c_�/_�p_�a_�s_�s_�w_�d  in  their  home  directory  for
             instance. However it will slow filename lookups down slightly.
             This option is enabled (i.e. s�sm�mb�bd�d will follow symbolic links) by
             default.
             Default: _�f_�o_�l_�l_�o_�w _�s_�y_�m_�l_�i_�n_�k_�s = yes

force create mode

      force create mode (S)
             This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that
             will a�al�lw�wa�ay�ys�s be set on a file created by Samba. This is  done  by
             bitwise  'OR'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a file that is
             being created or having its permissions changed. The default for
             this  parameter  is  (in octal) 000. The modes in this parameter
             are bitwise 'OR'ed onto the file mode after the mask set in  the
             _�c_�r_�e_�a_�t_�e _�m_�a_�s_�k parameter is applied.
             The example below would force all created files to have read and
             execute permissions set for 'group' and 'other' as well  as  the
             read/write/execute bits set for the 'user'.
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�c_�r_�e_�a_�t_�e _�m_�o_�d_�e = 000
             Example: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�c_�r_�e_�a_�t_�e _�m_�o_�d_�e = 0755

force directory mode

      force directory mode (S)
             This parameter specifies a set of UNIX mode bit permissions that
             will a�al�lw�wa�ay�ys�s be set on a directory created by Samba. This is done
             by  bitwise 'OR'ing these bits onto the mode bits of a directory
             that is being created. The default for  this  parameter  is  (in
             octal)  0000  which  will not add any extra permission bits to a
             created directory. This operation is done after the mode mask in
             the parameter _�d_�i_�r_�e_�c_�t_�o_�r_�y _�m_�a_�s_�k is applied.
             The  example  below  would force all created directories to have
             read and execute permissions set for 'group' and 'other' as well
             as the read/write/execute bits set for the 'user'.
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�d_�i_�r_�e_�c_�t_�o_�r_�y _�m_�o_�d_�e = 000
             Example: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�d_�i_�r_�e_�c_�t_�o_�r_�y _�m_�o_�d_�e = 0755

force directory security mode

      force directory security mode (S)
             This  parameter  controls what UNIX permission bits can be modi-
             fied when a Windows NT client is manipulating the  UNIX  permis-
             sion on a directory using the native NT security dialog box.
             This  parameter is applied as a mask (OR'ed with) to the changed
             permission bits, thus forcing any bits in  this  mask  that  the
             user  may  have modified to be on. Essentially, one bits in this
             mask may be treated as a set of bits that, when modifying  secu-
             rity on a directory, the user has always set to be 'on'.
             If not set explicitly this parameter is 000, which allows a user
             to modify all the user/group/world permissions  on  a  directory
             without restrictions.


             N�No�ot�te�e
             Users  who  can  access the Samba server through other means can
             easily bypass this restriction, so it is  primarily  useful  for
             standalone  "appliance"  systems.  Administrators of most normal
             systems will probably want to leave it set as 0000.
      Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�d_�i_�r_�e_�c_�t_�o_�r_�y _�s_�e_�c_�u_�r_�i_�t_�y _�m_�o_�d_�e = 0
      Example: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�d_�i_�r_�e_�c_�t_�o_�r_�y _�s_�e_�c_�u_�r_�i_�t_�y _�m_�o_�d_�e = 700


      group  This parameter is a synonym for force group.

force group

      force group (S)
             This specifies a UNIX group name that will be  assigned  as  the
             default  primary group for all users connecting to this service.
             This is useful for sharing files by ensuring that all access  to
             files  on service will use the named group for their permissions
             checking. Thus, by assigning permissions for this group  to  the
             files  and directories within this service the Samba administra-
             tor can restrict or allow sharing of these files.
             In Samba 2.0.5 and above this parameter has extended functional-
             ity  in  the  following way. If the group name listed here has a
             '+' character prepended to it then the  current  user  accessing
             the  share  only  has the primary group default assigned to this
             group if they are already assigned as a member  of  that  group.
             This  allows  an administrator to decide that only users who are
             already in a particular group will create files with group  own-
             ership set to that group. This gives a finer granularity of own-
             ership assignment. For example, the setting _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�g_�r_�o_�u_�p  _�=  _�+_�s_�y_�s
             means  that  only  users  who are already in group sys will have
             their default primary group assigned to sys when accessing  this
             Samba  share. All other users will retain their ordinary primary
             group.
             If the _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�u_�s_�e_�r parameter is also set the group  specified  in
             _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�g_�r_�o_�u_�p will override the primary group set in _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�u_�s_�e_�r.
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�g_�r_�o_�u_�p =
             Example: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�g_�r_�o_�u_�p = agroup

force printername

      force printername (S)
             When  printing  from  Windows  NT  (or  later),  each printer in
             _�s_�m_�b_�._�c_�o_�n_�f has two associated names  which  can  be  used  by  the
             client.  The  first  is  the sharename (or shortname) defined in
             smb.conf. This is the only printername available for use by Win-
             dows  9x  clients. The second name associated with a printer can
             be seen when  browsing  to  the  "Printers"  (or  "Printers  and
             Faxes")  folder  on the Samba server. This is referred to simply
             as the printername (not to be confused  with  the  _�p_�r_�i_�n_�t_�e_�r  _�n_�a_�m_�e
             option).
             When  assigning  a  new  driver to a printer on a remote Windows
             compatible print server such as Samba, the Windows  client  will
             rename  the printer to match the driver name just uploaded. This
             can result in confusion for users  when  multiple  printers  are
             bound  to  the  same  driver. To prevent Samba from allowing the
             printer's printername to differ from the  sharename  defined  in
             smb.conf, set _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�p_�r_�i_�n_�t_�e_�r_�n_�a_�m_�e _�= _�y_�e_�s.
             Be  aware  that  enabling  this  parameter  may affect migrating
             printers from a Windows server to Samba since Windows has no way
             to force the sharename and printername to match.
             It  is  recommended  that  this parameter's value not be changed
             once the printer is in use by clients as this could cause a user
             not  be  able  to  delete  printer  connections from their local
             Printers folder.
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�p_�r_�i_�n_�t_�e_�r_�n_�a_�m_�e = no

force security mode

      force security mode (S)
             This parameter controls what UNIX permission bits can  be  modi-
             fied  when  a Windows NT client is manipulating the UNIX permis-
             sion on a file using the native NT security dialog box.
             This parameter is applied as a mask (OR'ed with) to the  changed
             permission  bits,  thus  forcing  any bits in this mask that the
             user may have modified to be on. Essentially, one bits  in  this
             mask  may be treated as a set of bits that, when modifying secu-
             rity on a file, the user has always set to be 'on'.
             If not set explicitly this parameter is set to 0, and  allows  a
             user  to  modify all the user/group/world permissions on a file,
             with no restrictions.
             N�No�ot�te�e that users who can access the Samba  server  through  other
             means  can  easily  bypass  this restriction, so it is primarily
             useful for standalone  "appliance"  systems.  Administrators  of
             most  normal  systems  will  probably  want to leave this set to
             0000.
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�s_�e_�c_�u_�r_�i_�t_�y _�m_�o_�d_�e = 0
             Example: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�s_�e_�c_�u_�r_�i_�t_�y _�m_�o_�d_�e = 700

force unknown acl user

      force unknown acl user (S)
             If this parameter is set, a Windows  NT  ACL  that  contains  an
             unknown SID (security descriptor, or representation of a user or
             group id) as the owner or  group  owner  of  the  file  will  be
             silently  mapped  into  the  current UNIX uid or gid of the cur-
             rently connected user.
             This is designed to allow Windows NT clients to copy  files  and
             folders  containing ACLs that were created locally on the client
             machine and contain users local to that machine only (no  domain
             users)  to  be  copied to a Samba server (usually with XCOPY /O)
             and have the unknown userid and groupid of the file owner map to
             the  current  connected  user.  This can only be fixed correctly
             when winbindd allows arbitrary mapping from any Windows  NT  SID
             to a UNIX uid or gid.
             Try  using  this  parameter when XCOPY /O gives an ACCESS_DENIED
             error.
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�u_�n_�k_�n_�o_�w_�n _�a_�c_�l _�u_�s_�e_�r = no

force user

      force user (S)
             This specifies a UNIX user name that will  be  assigned  as  the
             default  user  for all users connecting to this service. This is
             useful for sharing files. You should also use  it  carefully  as
             using it incorrectly can cause security problems.
             This  user name only gets used once a connection is established.
             Thus clients still need to connect as a valid user and supply  a
             valid password. Once connected, all file operations will be per-
             formed as the "forced user", no matter what username the  client
             connected as. This can be very useful.
             In  Samba 2.0.5 and above this parameter also causes the primary
             group of the forced user to be used as the primary group for all
             file  activity. Prior to 2.0.5 the primary group was left as the
             primary group of the connecting user (this was a bug).
             Default: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�u_�s_�e_�r =
             Example: _�f_�o_�r_�c_�e _�u_�s_�e_�r = auser

fstype

      fstype (S)
             This parameter allows the administrator to configure the  string
             that  specifies  the type of filesystem a share is using that is
             reported by s�sm�mb�bd�d(8) when a client queries  the  filesystem  type
             for  a  share.  The  default type is N�NT�TF�FS�S for compatibility with
             Windows NT but this can be changed  to  other  strings  such  as
             S�Sa�am�mb�ba�a or F�FA�AT�T  if required.
             Default: _�f_�s_�t_�y_�p_�e = NTFS
             Example: _�f_�s_�t_�y_�p_�e = Samba